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20130417
20130417
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
to work with them before on cases. between the fbi and atf there's probably no better lab. as jim will tell you, when a bomb goes off, it may get blown to bits, but those are bits that we can recover. that his agency and the fbi can put together. they can understand the device. and perhaps find a signature aspect to that. so we've got a forensic investigation that's going on as far as the bomb and where it went off and what it was composed of and who may have built it. we also have what you just talked about, chris, that photographic evidence. as you and i talked yesterday, i guarantee you yesterday and today there are photographs of the individual or individuals who placed those devices. we just have to separate the weak from the -- in this case the killers from the crowd and we'll know who did that. >> let me go over to mr. cavanaugh. james, it seems to me a picture dh can be blown up and stud did, what more would you want actually than someone dropping the black bag and walking away from the bomb site? >> chris, i've worked many cases over the years with no pictures at all. so
are in the nature of the bomb. >>> up next, abc's senior national correspondent jim avila, shows us just how far the blast from the bombs traveled. >> reporter: the killer bombs likely contained less than two pounds of common black powder explosive, says one of the nations leading ied experts. even leaving the characteristic white smoke. bombs designed to spread terror and death with a lethal blast of metal shrapnel. >> looks like he was out to kill and maim. >> reporter: hold it right there. here we see windows blown out here, but the buildings themselves are intact. what does that tell us about what this bomber wanted to do? >> that he did not want to take down the building. that wasn't his main target. it was to disrupt the marathon and kill people in that immediate area. >> reporter: houston says this is classic ied design, the kill zone from the blast, one to two yards. according to the accounts from the bomb's site, powerful enough to knock a runner off his feet ten yards away. and topple another man on his couch from the third floor of the building next door, 20 yards away. >> it looks li
a new product to enhance intercourse. jim? >> sexcereal. that is it's name. it's being billed as the world's most passional cereal. it features special natural blends for both men and women. the promos are playful showing a couple at first bored in bed. then throw in some sex cereal and, of course, some sex, which we don't see. and the mood picks up. >> colbert: yes, the mood picks up when you throw in some sexcereal and some sex. its manufacturer claims it's part of a balanced breakfast. you'll need that balance when you're doing it in the brek fooft nook. that's why i'm giving a tip of the hat to sex-cereal for making sure we'll never skip breakfast ( cheers and applause ) by which again i mean sex. the old 23 skidoo. because at 6:30 a.m. with bleary eyes and breath like a landfill corpse, who isn't champing at the bit to get bizay? here's how it works >> the cereal boasts all natural ingredients like bee pollen, wheat german pumpkin seeds supposedly all natural stimulants for men and women >> colbert: you do not have to tell me about pumpkin seeds. you should see how i carv
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
, this is just photographer jim goff walking along the crowded sidewalk. and lord & taylor, in the hours following this investigation, officials went into the buildings and businesses to collect surveillance video from around the time of the marathon and obviously, the time of the blast to try and glean any evidence that would lead to a suspect. we've got the good news that there could be a suspect and possibly this video that you're watching right now, that's my shoulder, if you notice and jim following me, that big sign is just someone who came up with the bright idea. >> megyn: fox news alert and now it is being told to fox news to a fox news reporter that indeed an arrest has been made, na indeed an arrest has been made and in part we're told based possibly on video from a news station. don't go away. [ male announcer ] hunt...farm...or trail... polaris has what you wan legdary atvs led by the powerful sportsman 850 ho. value-minded side-by-sides featuring the new ranger 800 midsize. and full-size workhorses including the all-new, class-leading, 60-horsepower, ranger xp 900. polaris.
the giants. >> gary: this is jim kelly he's the new coach of the eagles, they have been giving l.a. to your probation. he made payments to a recruiter service to a man that had connections to players. >> gary: there should be a rule if the school is on probation, bubka coach should be on probation. >> pam: bomb probably, and don't do that! >> gary: we will take a break i guess the world is in a pretty good place. guess who is the favored for the u.s. open? [ man ] we have a go for auto sequence start. t-minus 5, 4, 3, 2, 1... ignition. [ male announcer ] launch your internet experience on at&t's newly expanded advanced digital network and connect more wi-fi-enabled devices at home. [ female announcer ] call to get u-verse high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month -- a guaranteed price for 12 months. or ask how to get your choice of a kindle fire hd, sonos play:3 or xbox 360 free with other qualifying internet offers. [ male announcer ] and get more speed for wi-fi gaming, more reliability than ever and more connectivity between devices. [ female announcer ] so call to get u-verse high
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
your bank of america stock or selling it? here to discuss this, jim senegal, financial services analyst from "morningstar". thank you for joining us. what do you think of the report in the first place? banks manipulate the numbers for instance, moving loan-loss reserves over to the balance sheet. other banks have done that. can we believe numbers and are banks worse perhaps than we believe with bank of america? >> bank of america did release some reserves. that is something all the banks are doing. it is something i don't think a lot of investors look at. there is some help to the bottom line there. other than that it was a pretty clean quarter, asking considering all of the unusual charges for bank of america has had in the past few years. i think the problem is, the earnings really aren't anything to get excited about. even though bank of america's problems are receding into the past they're still not making a lot of money and a lot of that has to do with the macroeconomic environment. adam: when you talk about problems receding into the past, the big problem would be countrywide. i t
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)